One Step towards Artifical Liver Models:

The sophisticated tools of the GeSiM bioprinters enable high-level tissue engineering. Here we present a recent paper published by the Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research at the Faculty of Medicine of TU Dresden.

The liver is a pretty complex organ, consisting of different cell types with specific functions, arranged at particular patterns like small “lobules”. Bioengineering of 3D liver constructs is therefore challenging but offering great potential for drug screening/ toxicity testing as well as for disease models. One part of this study was the development of a co-culture system with the Core/Shell extruder on a GeSiM BS3.1 bioprinter. The Core/Shell tool ensures high contact areas between the two different phases.

Core/Shell Extruder for GeSiM bioprinters: Two separate pneumatic dosage channels end up in two co-axial arranged metal nozzles

Core/Shell Extruder for GeSiM bioprinters: Two separate pneumatic dosage channels end up in two co-axial arranged metal nozzles

Stereo microscopic image of a cell-free core–shell strand, deposited in meandering shape, with clear separation of core (algMC) and shell (algMC + Matrigel) compartments within the strand; scale bar 2 mm. [1]

Stereo microscopic image of a cell-free core–shell strand, deposited in meandering shape, with clear separation of core (algMC) and shell (algMC + Matrigel) compartments within the strand; scale bar 2 mm. [1]

Stereo microscopic image of a cell-free, printed scaffold with blue stain in the core for visualizing the continuous core compartment through the coaxial strand; The insert shows a section through the strand segment, cut out from the scaffold scale bar 2 mm. [1]

Stereo microscopic image of a cell-free, printed scaffold with blue stain in the core for visualizing the continuous core compartment through the coaxial strand; The insert shows a section through the strand segment, cut out from the scaffold scale bar 2 mm. [1]

Graphical representation of the hepatocyte-fibroblast co-culture concept, showing hepatocytes encapsulated in the shell are coaxially printed with NIH 3T3 fibroblasts in the core, both co-printed as single cells in their respective bioink (left). An influence of the core composition (with or without fibroblasts and matrix components) on hepatocyte phenotype is hypothesized as they might grow into clusters within their shell compartment and fibroblasts spread to form networks over the cultivation period (right). Images created using Biorender.com software. [1]

Graphical representation of the hepatocyte-fibro